Auteursarchief: Paul Westeneng

How to Get the Most Out of Student-Owned Devices in Any Classroom

Technical issues with devices can be a headache, so setting some ground rules for device management helps mitigate some hiccups. Mills recommends making it clear that it is students’ responsibility to bring their device to school charged and ready to go. Designating a spot on student desks or tables where devices go when they aren’t being used for a specific assignment is also a great way to deter students from succumbing to distraction.

Source: blogs.kqed.org

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Handy iPad Posters to Use in The First Week of School ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

“If you are planning to incorporate iPad in your classroom teaching then you definitely need to work on some preliminary stuff before anything else. These are basically formalities and conventions students need to abide by when using iPad in class. Making students explicitly aware of their responsibilities behind using iPad in class will certainly help you tap into the full educational potential of this versatile gadget. I have gone through my archive and picked out these handy visuals for you to use with your students.”

Source: www.educatorstechnology.com

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A Thousand Rivers: A Thousand River What the modern world has forgotten about children and learning.

In other words, they could read for all the same reasons that we can now use computers. We don’t know how to use computers because we learned it in school, but because we wanted to learn it and we were free to learn it in whatever way worked best for us. It is the saddest of ironies that many people now see the fluidity and effectiveness of this process as a characteristic of computers, rather than what it is, which is a characteristic of human beings.

Source: schoolingtheworld.org

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Motivation: The Overlooked Sixth Component of Reading

Learners are motivated by three factors: desire to learn, incentives, or fear of failure. As we grow, most of the early curiosity is tested away, and school becomes work. Obstacles increase, desire to learn decreases, and incentives and/or fear of failure move to the forefront. Jack Canfield, self-esteem expert, reports that 80 percent of first graders posses high self-esteem, but by high school graduation, this drops to a staggering five percent.

Source: www.edutopia.org

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Embracing Messy Learning

I am slowly learning to embrace the struggles that students experience as they engage with authentic work. If I don’t allow learning to be messy, I eliminate authentic experiences for students as thinkers and creators. I find it important to regularly remind myself that frustration leads to insights and that learning is not necessarily the equivalent of mastery.

Source: www.edutopia.org

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